Tate Britain, London

(Source: rimbly, via aurelle)

Now I’m yours // Ahora soy tuyo

subversionsubversion:

por/by Cristine Brache

text of the video poem below

texto traducido del poema video abajo

[vimeo 61014374 w=500 h=281]

Now I’m Yours from Cristine Brache on Vimeo.

ahora soy tuyo

admito

tus manos vacías

se ven bastante solitaria

por decir lo menos.

View Post

bonapartist:

so i was looking up stuff about birth control throughout history and

image

y el villano sigue la persigue”

(Source: georgemallory, via catscraftssatan-deactivated2014)

"no te atrevas a olvidar: el trabajo sexual es trabajo verdadero”

"no te atrevas a olvidar:
el trabajo sexual es trabajo verdadero”

(Source: sexworkerproblems, via xlafirmereinax)

stayceerantsandraves:

maladjustedxvx:

annadraconida:

This is an animal dying on a fur farm in China. It grew up in a barren cage the size of a newspaper, living off meat processing waste deemed unfit even for pet food production. When it reached adult size, it was yanked out of the cage and received a couple of blows to the head, after which it was hung upside down & slowly skinned alive. After the fur was pulled off over its head, the agonizing body was thrown onto a pile of carcasses, where it expired in the most horrible way you can (or should I say, can’t) imagine.

Besides bludgeoning, the killing methods on fur farms include gassing, electrocution, poisoning with strychnine, or breaking the animals’ necks. Most of these methods don’t exclude the possibility of the animal regaining consciousness while its fur is being… removed.

This is the true cost of a “fabulous”, “glamorous” fur coat or collar, not the amount of money on the price tag.

Smash the face of every piece of shit fur industry supporter out there.

People think I am lying when I say animals survive the “killing” process frequently.  I’m guessing that the videographer didn’t have to wait a long time for this shot. 

(via ewwwnicorn)

subversionsubversion:

No existe una sola verdad. Tod@s somos diferentes. No tenemos que estar de acuerdo pero podemos intercambiar, compartir, discutir y conocer mejor nuestros contextos y aprender, cambiar y mejorar nuestras sociedades.Subversion/Subversión (www.subversionsubversion.com) es una revista artística, virtual, feminista, transnacional en Inglés y Español. La cualidad multilenguaje de Subversion/Subversión permite un real intercambio internacional .Queremos incluir tu punto de vista en la conversación, presenta tus trabajos artísticos o artículos a info@subversionsubversion.com!
Dar un like a www.facebook.com/subversionsubversion!

subversionsubversion:

No existe una sola verdad. Tod@s somos diferentes. No tenemos que estar de acuerdo pero podemos intercambiar, compartir, discutir y conocer mejor nuestros contextos y aprender, cambiar y mejorar nuestras sociedades.

Subversion/Subversión (www.subversionsubversion.com) es una revista artística, virtual, feminista, transnacional en Inglés y Español. La cualidad multilenguaje de Subversion/Subversión permite un real intercambio internacional .

Queremos incluir tu punto de vista en la conversación, presenta tus trabajos artísticos o artículos a info@subversionsubversion.com!

Dar un like a www.facebook.com/subversionsubversion!

subversionsubversion:

There is no one truth. We are not all the same. We do not all need to agree. But we can exchange and share and talk and get to know each other’s situations better and learn, and change our societies for the better.Subversion/Subversión (www.subversionsubversion.com) is an online transnational feminist art magazine in English and Spanish. The multilingual quality of Subversion/Subversión allows for a truly international exchange.We can’t wait to include your view in the conversation, submit your artwork or your writing at info@subversionsubversion.com!
Like www.facebook.com/subversionsubversion!

subversionsubversion:

There is no one truth. We are not all the same. We do not all need to agree. But we can exchange and share and talk and get to know each other’s situations better and learn, and change our societies for the better.

Subversion/Subversión (www.subversionsubversion.com) is an online transnational feminist art magazine in English and Spanish. The multilingual quality of Subversion/Subversión allows for a truly international exchange.

We can’t wait to include your view in the conversation, submit your artwork or your writing at info@subversionsubversion.com!

Like www.facebook.com/subversionsubversion!

itsagrrrl:

rainwood:

Indigenous people of Brazil trying to prevent their eviction from an old indigenous museum which they have been living in for the past 7 years.

On March 22nd all of the inhabitants and their supporters were forcibly removed or arrested.

The building is being destroyed to make a parking lot :(

I repeat. “TO MAKE [A FUCKING] PARKING LOT”!! 

sinidentidades:

Immigrants Held in Solitary Cells, Often for Weeks
On any given day, about 300 immigrants are held in solitary confinement at the 50 largest detention facilities that make up the sprawling patchwork of holding centers nationwide overseen by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials, according to new federal data.
Nearly half are isolated for 15 days or more, the point at which psychiatric experts say they are at risk for severe mental harm, with about 35 detainees kept for more than 75 days.
While the records do not indicate why immigrants were put in solitary, an adviser who helped the immigration agency review the numbers estimated that two-thirds of the cases involved disciplinary infractions like breaking rules, talking back to guards or getting into fights. Immigrants were also regularly isolated because they were viewed as a threat to other detainees or personnel or for protective purposes when the immigrant was queer or mentally handicapped.
The United States has come under sharp criticism at home and abroad for relying on solitary confinement in its prisons more than any other democratic nation in the world. While Immigration and Customs Enforcement places only about 1 percent of its jailed immigrants in solitary, this practice is nonetheless startling because those detainees are being held on civil, not criminal, charges. As such, they are not supposed to be punished; they are simply confined to ensure that they appear for administrative hearings.
After federal immigration authorities caught up with him, Rashed BinRashed, an [undocumented] arrival from Yemen, was sent to a detention center in Juneau, Wis. He was put in solitary confinement, he says, after declining to go to the jail’s eating area and refusing meals because he wanted to fast during Ramadan.
Federal officials confined Delfino Quiroz, a gay immigrant from Mexico, in solitary for four months in 2010, saying it was for his own protection, he recalls. He sank into a deep depression as he overheard three inmates attempt suicide. “Please, God,” he remembers praying, “don’t let me be the same.”
As lawmakers in Washington consider an overhaul of the immigration system, Congress faces thorny questions not just about what status to grant immigrants already in the country, but also about how best to increase enforcement efforts and what rights to ensure [undocumented] immigrants during their detention.

sinidentidades:

Immigrants Held in Solitary Cells, Often for Weeks

On any given day, about 300 immigrants are held in solitary confinement at the 50 largest detention facilities that make up the sprawling patchwork of holding centers nationwide overseen by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials, according to new federal data.

Nearly half are isolated for 15 days or more, the point at which psychiatric experts say they are at risk for severe mental harm, with about 35 detainees kept for more than 75 days.

While the records do not indicate why immigrants were put in solitary, an adviser who helped the immigration agency review the numbers estimated that two-thirds of the cases involved disciplinary infractions like breaking rules, talking back to guards or getting into fights. Immigrants were also regularly isolated because they were viewed as a threat to other detainees or personnel or for protective purposes when the immigrant was queer or mentally handicapped.

The United States has come under sharp criticism at home and abroad for relying on solitary confinement in its prisons more than any other democratic nation in the world. While Immigration and Customs Enforcement places only about 1 percent of its jailed immigrants in solitary, this practice is nonetheless startling because those detainees are being held on civil, not criminal, charges. As such, they are not supposed to be punished; they are simply confined to ensure that they appear for administrative hearings.

After federal immigration authorities caught up with him, Rashed BinRashed, an [undocumented] arrival from Yemen, was sent to a detention center in Juneau, Wis. He was put in solitary confinement, he says, after declining to go to the jail’s eating area and refusing meals because he wanted to fast during Ramadan.

Federal officials confined Delfino Quiroz, a gay immigrant from Mexico, in solitary for four months in 2010, saying it was for his own protection, he recalls. He sank into a deep depression as he overheard three inmates attempt suicide. “Please, God,” he remembers praying, “don’t let me be the same.”

As lawmakers in Washington consider an overhaul of the immigration system, Congress faces thorny questions not just about what status to grant immigrants already in the country, but also about how best to increase enforcement efforts and what rights to ensure [undocumented] immigrants during their detention.

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

To whom this may concern,

so I’m currently in Guatemala City working on the website for this online, multi-lingual, transnational feminist art mag we’re starting with friends from here. The idea is for it to be a truly international collective effort. The website is set up in both English and Spanish, everything will be consistently translated into the other. The idea is for it to be multilingual in the sense that every contributor can write in their own language, in whatever language they feel most comfortable in. And then we translate it to English and Spanish.

 

The reason that we think this is important is because there are a lot of feminist magazines/resources on the internet but they are mostly in English. But it being in only Spanish would kind of defeat the purpose. In true transnational feminist practice, or at least our understanding of it, we want to connect people and ideas from all over, without having one truth. We are not all the same, we do not all need to agree. But we can exchange and share and talk and get to know each other’s situations better and learn.

 

We want it to be of art and about art because art is a way to express ourselves, outside of the highly inaccessible world of academics. We believe that art can bring people together in their truest expressions of self. At the same time a transnational feminist critique of the art that is being made in the world can teach us more about the world around us and about our own visions of the world. There are so many wonderful people doing wonderful things, as well as wonderful people doing not so wonderful things that could use some decent critiquing. So we’re looking for both contributions in the way of art as contributions in the way of writing about other people’s art.

 

There’s different levels of getting involved, you decide how involved you wanna get. All the way to the decision making or just sending posts now and then to one of the administrators who will translate and post it for you.

 

Next week I’ll be back in Europe (I’m Belgian), but I’ll be working together closely still with the crew here in Guatemala City as well as contributors that have already committed to the project from all over Europe and North America. For the magazine to be a living thing we need contributors from all over, with different backgrounds and different interests. I am working on finding contacts in other parts of the world.

 

If anyone feel like getting involved on any level, please do get in touch! Or if you just wanna talk about the concept a little more, have more questions, or anything else, let me hear it!
For now you can e-mail me at lauradevos@gmail.com. And share this with your friends and followers if you think you might know someone who is interested in being a part of this!

 

xoxo

Tags: feminism art DIY

dancinginthesetrees:

““Ms. Norman” another kid called, “Have you heard about that rape case in Ohio? Those guys got convicted. They have to go to jail. They are going to lose their scholarships. They were going to D-1 schools!”

“Well…”I responded, feeling the heat crawl up my neck, “maybe they are going to jail for rape because THEY ARE RAPISTS!” I yelled those last three words at my kids and watched as some of them blinked in surprise. Apparently, the thought had never occurred to them that these athletes who were convicted of rape, were in fact rapists.

It is a strange thing about looking into the face of a 15-year-old, to really see who they are. You still see the small child that their mother sees. You see the man or woman they will be before they graduate. They are babies whose innocence you want desperately to protect. They are old enough to know better, even if no one has taught them.

I realized then that some of my kids were genuinely confused. “How can she be raped?” they asked, “She wasn’t awake to say no.” These words out of a full fledged adult would have made me furious. I did get a good few minutes in response on victim blaming and why it is so terrible. But out of the face of a kid who still has baby fat, those words just made me sick. My students are still young enough, that mostly they just spout what they have learned, and they have learned that absent a no, the yes is implied.

It is uncomfortable to think that some of the students you still call babies have the potential to be rapists. It is sickening, it is terrifying, but it is true.  It is a reality we have to face. My students have lived in a world for fifteen years where the joke “she probably wanted it” isn’t really a joke, they need to unlearn some lessons that no one will admit to teaching them.

Standing in front of my classroom and stating that a woman’s clothing choice is never permission to rape her should not be a radical act. But only a few heads nodded in agreement. Most were stunned, like this was a completely new thought. The follow up questions were terrifying in their earnestness. “Ms. Norman, you mean a woman walking down the street naked is not her inviting sex? How will I know she wants to have sex?”  A surprisingly bold voice came out of a girl in the back “You’ll know when she says, you want to have sex?!”

If you want to keep teens from being rapists, you can no longer assume that they know how. You HAVE to talk about it. There is no longer a choice. It is no longer enough to talk to our kids about the mechanics of sex, it probably never was. We have to talk about consent, what it means, and how you are sure you have it. We have to teach clearly and boldly that consent is (in the words of Dianna E. Anderson) an enthusiastic, unequivocal YES!”

-A selection from an excellent blog post by Abby Norman, a 9th grade teacher who, after introducing a poem to the class for discussion, accidentally found herself teaching them about consent. 

This is why it is SO IMPORTANT to talk about consent as a yes instead of a lack of no. And why we must TEACH it instead of assuming that people already understand. 

(via seattlegrrrlarmy)

"[TW: Rape] According to statistics from the United States Department of Justice, for every white woman who reports a rape, there are at least five black women who are raped but do not report it. For every black woman who reports her rape, at least 15 black women’s sexual assaults go unreported."

Race is a feminist issue (via sparkamovement)

(via seattlegrrrlarmy)

In the cool friends who do cool things series, check out Wolfnote. Thank me later.


http://wolfnote.bandcamp.com/
or download the songs here
http://www.mediafire.com/?c333rdmmp4olrg3

Spot on, made me giggle several times. How are these situations always the same? Let’s not ever go through this again.

Dirty Girls